South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem supports the ban on abortion pills and defends the “trigger” ban even in cases of rape or incest

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South Dakota is among seven states that are “triggering” laws making abortion illegal, pending enactment deer v calf, are now available. Similar legislation in six other states is expected to go into effect within the next 30 days or subject to approval by state officials. Most don’t make exceptions for rape or incest.

Gov. Kristi Noem appeared on CBS Face the Nation on Sunday and defended her state’s “trigger” law, which bans abortions in nearly all cases, including pregnancies resulting from rape or incest.

“I believe that every life is precious,” she said. “And I just never believed that if tragedy or a tragic situation happened to someone, it was a reason for another tragedy.”

The 14 states with the most restrictive abortion laws, including South Dakota, have the worst maternal health outcomes and the lowest federal support for women and children, according to the nonpartisan research group Commonwealth Fund.

The governor also defended her efforts to ban women from using telemedicine appointments to obtain prescription abortion drugs after the US Supreme Court ruled to overturn the landmark ruling enshrining the constitutional right to abortion.

She signed a bill into law earlier this year that would restrict access to medical abortion by requiring patients to make at least three visits to a clinic. Similar laws have been introduced in states in the United States.

“These are very dangerous medical procedures,” she claimed on CBS Face the nation On Sunday. “We don’t think it should be available because it’s a dangerous situation for a person without medical supervision from a doctor.”

Two-drug therapy with mifepristone and misoprostol—drugs that are available over the counter in some countries—is overwhelmingly safe and effective.

Medical termination of pregnancy is by far the most common form of abortion treatment in the United States, accounting for nearly 60 percent of all procedures. The drug was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2000 in most cases up to the 10th week of pregnancy. The vast majority of abortions occur within the first nine weeks.

Last year, the FDA permanently removed personal prescription for abortion drugs, allowing patients to access the drugs through telemedicine appointments and online pharmacies so patients can take the drugs at home.

Mifepristone is also commonly used to treat miscarriage, which occurs in about one in ten pregnancies.

President Joe Biden has instructed health officials to “find every way to ensure mifepristone is as widely available as possible” after “state officials threatened that they will seek to ban or severely limit access to reproductive health drugs.” , according to the White House .

US Attorney General Merrick Garland said the US Department of Justice “stands ready to work with other parts of the federal government that are attempting to use their lawful agencies to protect and preserve access to reproductive care.”

“Specifically, the FDA has approved the use of the drug mifepristone,” he said. “States may not ban mifepristone based on disagreements with the FDA’s expert judgment as to its safety and efficacy.”

“Trigger” laws and anti-abortion restrictions have so far made no distinction between medical abortions and procedural abortions.

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