Global Anti Scam Alliance and ScamAdviser study suggest China is the world’s top direct seller of counterfeit goods

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AMSTERDAM, April 26, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Global Anti Scam Alliance and ScamAdviser.com surveyed 1,494 consumers from around the world, asking them why they buy counterfeits and how to stop them from buying counterfeits. Remarkably, China is not only the largest producer of counterfeit products, but also the largest online retailer of counterfeit goods.

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Counterfeit goods are valued at over $500 billion annually

According to the OECD, 3.3% of world trade is now counterfeit. Shoes accounted for almost a quarter of the goods seized, making them the most popular copied product. But clothing, perfumes, electronic devices and watches are also popular.

69% of all survey participants state that they are good at detecting counterfeits

According to a study by the Global Anti Scam Alliance and ScamAdviser, most consumers (69%) believe they are able to spot counterfeits. This is especially true for clothing, accessories and electronics. 45% of consumers doubt their ability to identify counterfeit medicines.

92% of all consumers have bought counterfeits

However, 70% of consumers have in the past unknowingly bought a counterfeit product or doubted the authenticity of the product. 21% admit to knowingly buying counterfeits. Clothing, electronics and accessories are the most commonly purchased counterfeit products.

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Websites, not marketplaces, are the primary shopping channel

The focus of brand protection agencies has shifted to online marketplaces in recent years. However, it is worth noting that websites (41%) are by far the most popular channel for buying counterfeits. This channel is followed by online marketplaces (32%).

Social media sites are growing and are cited by 28% of consumers. 22% bought fakes in physical stores, which are losing market share.

39% think the fakes are sold directly from China

When asked about the country of origin of counterfeit goods, 39% of consumers named China. Surprisingly, they were followed by the United States (9%) and India (6%).

According to an OECD report, most counterfeit goods picked up by customs come from China. Other places of origin are the Emirates, Turkey, Singapore, Thailand and India. However, many consumers have named their own countries, suggesting that they are being misled into believing that the counterfeit goods they are buying are from their own countries.

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Consumers are deterred by fears, not ethics

Consumers buy counterfeits mainly because they believe there will not be a significant difference in quality (16%). Affordability (16%) is also a big motivator for buying counterfeits, and feeling that the genuine brand is overpriced (12%) is also cited.

Consumers are aware that counterfeiting fuels crime. However, what would most discourage consumers from buying counterfeits is the quality of the product (42%) and the belief that buying counterfeits is not safe if their financial details are misused (38%) and the product is not delivered will (32%). ).

The report can be downloaded from GASA.org and ScamAdviser.com. Contact: [email protected]

Related Images

Figure 1: Where do consumers buy counterfeits from?

Where do consumers buy counterfeits from?

This content was distributed via Newswire.com’s press release distribution service.

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