Fake championship rings, the 2.38 MILLION. US dollars would have been worth if they were real, are intercepted from China

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The shipment of 86 fake championship rings from China, which would have been worth $ 2.38 MILLION if they were real, is intercepted by customs agents in Chicago

  • The rings arrived in Chicago last week and were on their way to a house in Florissant, Missouri
  • They were caught because of their “poor quality” and lack of “security features”.
  • These included 34 from the New York Yankees and 24 from the Chicago Bulls
  • Customs and Border Patrol announced no arrests on the matter
  • Championship rings vary in price depending on the team, player and year
  • A 2001 ring owned by Shaquille O’Neal is now selling for nearly $ 30,000 on eBay
  • In 2019, customs agents seized up to $ 1.5 billion worth of counterfeit goods










Customs officials in Chicago confiscated a shipment of counterfeit championship rings sent from China that would have been worth $ 2.38 million if they were real.

Feds discover the fraudulent collectibles because of their “poor quality” and lack of “security features”.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection intercepted the shipment of 86 championship rings from China on September 13 for a home in Florissant, Missouri.

The agency did not announce in a press release on Tuesday who sent them or whether someone was arrested.

The collectibles represented professional teams from various sports. These included 34 rings from the New York Yankees, 24 from the Chicago Bulls, 22 from the St. Louis Cardinals and six from the Philadelphia Eagles.

The 86 counterfeit rings that represent different teams came from China and were made to Missouri. directed

Real championship rings, like the Yankees ring above seen during a press conference in the Bronx in April 2010, vary in price by team, year and player

Real championship rings, like the Yankees ring above, seen during a press conference in the Bronx in April 2010, vary in price by team, year and player

“Shows like this prey on many sports fans across the country who may be tricked into paying high prices for counterfeit memorabilia,” said LaFonda Sutton-Burke, director of field operations in Chicago.

“I am very proud of these officials’ determination to stop illegal shipments and our commitment to protecting the American economy.”

Chicago’s Trade Enforcement Team, the agency’s own competence and competence centers, “discovered that the rings were counterfeit because all goods were of poor quality and had no security features,” the agency said.

They warn that the rise in e-commerce has made consumers more vulnerable to counterfeit goods, as these are often shipped from abroad and sometimes fund organized crime operations.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, upstairs at Chicago O'Hare Airport, seized 27,600 shipments of counterfeit goods worth up to $ 1.5 billion in 2019

U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the top of Chicago O’Hare Airport seized 27,600 shipments of counterfeit goods valued at up to $ 1.5 billion in 2019

In 2019, CBP seized nearly 27,600 shipments of counterfeit goods worth up to $ 1.5 billion if they were real.

The value of legitimate championship rings depends on many factors: the team, the importance of the win, and the player or team member who owned it, to name a few.

In 2008, the New York Giants’ Super Bowl ring, designed by Tiffany, cost $ 5,500 and was valued at around $ 25,000, according to the New York Times.

Currently, an authentic 2001 championship ring won by former Los Angeles Laker Shaquille O’Neal costs $ 29,500 on eBay.

The ring made of 14 carat gold with yellow and white diamonds was presented to his publicist Donnie Wilson, whose name is engraved on the inner band.

Last month, customs officials came across two shipments from China and Hong Kong containing 500 counterfeit Cartier jewelry items valued at $ 5.24 million in the open market.

The broadcasts went to Florida and Mississippi and were mixed with other bracelets and rings, some of which were real.


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